Rare Aircraft – Seawind 3000 9A-DZZ

By Boran Pivčić
All photos author

By a stroke of good luck, after an hour’s worth of musing, I had finally decided to go to Lučko a couple of days back, forsaking studying meteorology for a chance to finally breathe some fresh air. I had a hunch I would find something interesting, but what I saw when I arrived at the field nearly took my breath away – a half-assembled Seawind 3000! Now normally, I wouldn’t get so excited by a new aircraft at the field, but I’m an absolute fan of rare aircraft such as this, so seeing it’s not-at-all-unnoticeable tail above the hedges grabbed my interest in an instant.

9A-DZZ, as it transpired, is the first Seawind on the Balkans and – as far as I’ve been able to dig up – one of the very few in Europe (the closest one is in Italy, with the rest I think split between the UK, Sweden and Russia). It’s rarity – and considering it’s a relatively very new design that somehow made it down here in less than 20 years – meant that I was naturally all over it, with dozens of photos to prove it :).

The Seawind 3000 itself is a composite four-seater amphibian, powered by a 300-310 HP Continental IO-550. Despite the added drag of the wingtip stabilizer floats and stepped hull, this thing goes pretty nicely performance-wise, with a cruise speed in the 150 knot range fully loaded. Coupled with enough fuel for a range in excess of 1500 km and a rather spacious interior, the 3000 is a very capable amphib tourer.

Currently in assembly – with most of the big bits bolted on – DZZ is expected to fly soon and rumor is she may be based at Varaždin in the north of the country (despite being far inland, Varaždin has a large-ish saltwater lake on the Drava river, which this aircraft could potentially use).

Effortlessly dominating the ramp, even half assembled :)

Effortlessly dominating the ramp, even half assembled 🙂

Waiting for its wings to be attached. The surfaces out on the grass are the flaps that would be fitted when the wing was in place

Waiting for its wings to be mounted. The surfaces out on the grass are the flaps that would be fitted when the wing was up in place

A very hard aircraft to miss among the usual Skyhawks. If Lučko aircraft recognition is up to date, this is only the fourth fully-/significantly-composite aircraft here, along with a Diamond DA-40TDi Star, Valentin Taifun 17F and a Grob G-109 motorglider

A very hard aircraft to miss among the usual Skyhawks. If my Lučko aircraft recognition is up to date, this is only the fourth fully-/significantly-composite aircraft here, along with a Diamond DA-40TDi Star, Valentin Taifun 17F and a Grob G-109 motorglider

Not easily visible in this photo - the high sun, a clean, white aircraft and a black panel don't mix very well - but the cockpit sports a Blue Mountain Avionics EFIS system... and not much else visible

Not easily visible in this photo - the high sun, a clean, white aircraft and a black panel don't mix very well - but the cockpit sports a Blue Mountain Avionics EFIS system... and not much else visible

Panel closeup (excuse the lower technical quality). Like the rest of the aircraft, the panel is composite too (carbon fibre in this instance) with lots of room for additional avionics

Panel closeup (excuse the lower technical quality). Like the rest of the aircraft, the panel is composite too (carbon fiber in this instance) with lots of room for additional avionics

Quite curvy, the looks of the 3000 have invited numerous different opinions, from awesome to ackward :)

Quite curvy, the looks of the 3000 have invited numerous different opinions, from awesome to awkward 🙂

A bit out of its element between the grass and mountains, DZZ appeared with wings on the next day, towed next to the main taxiway away from the main ramp

A bit out of its element between the grass and mountains, DZZ appeared with wings on the next day, towed next to the main taxiway away from the main ramp

The sunset of the same day saw it no longer flapless. Here's hoping for a quick first flight!

The sunset of the same day saw it no longer flapless. Here's hoping for a quick first flight!

5 thoughts on “Rare Aircraft – Seawind 3000 9A-DZZ

  1. It is currently based at Lučko airfield (ICAO: LDZL) just outside Zagreb, Croatia. After it is fully completed, rumor has it it will move to Varaždin (LDVA) in the north of the country.

  2. I have been flying my seawind for 2.5 years. It is one of the best airplanes I have ever flown. Wen trimmed, I can fly hands off for a long time. Max cruise is/was 210 knots.

    Join us at

    http://seawindpilots.com/

    Join the forum for up to date building information and safety notices.

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